Update on Sunscreens

With summer approaching, it’s time to take another look at sunscreens.

The products list on Solveeczema.org is notably short on sunscreens.  We had good luck with Mustela’s Moderate Sun Protection Stick (SPF 20), but a company spokesperson told me last week that the product has been long discontinued and they have no remaining stock.

That’s a shame, since it was not only a great sunscreen — it didn’t seem to wear off even after hours in the sun and water, and it seemed to have better protection than the advertised SPF 20 — it was also the only Mustela product on the Environmental Working Group’s 17 most safe and effective sunscreen products.  (Scroll down the page to see the list and a link to a more comprehensive list of products and the EWG’s evaluation of them.  You can also search for products to see their ranking and list of ingredients via a box on the right of the page.)

I used the EWG’s list to try out a few of the sunscreens, and found them to be fine for my son.  We liked Badger Unscented SPF 30 Sunscreen, Loving Naturals SPF 30+, and Keys-Soap Solar RX SPF 30+ the best.

Mustela sent me a sample of the product they make to replace their discontinued sunstick, their SPF 50 Sun Cream for Sensitive Areas.  It also proved to be fine.  (It scores a 3 on the EWG’s rating system, 0 being safest and 10 being most problematic.)

We have tried California Baby stick sunscreens, and based on the ingredients, they too should be fine per the issues on Solveeczema.  They rank well on the EWG’s list of safe and effective sunscreens.  Note:  the California Baby stick sunscreen we tried gave my son a rash, but it couldn’t be because of the active ingredients, it must be an individual allergy.  A friend whose preschooler has this detergent problem worse than my son and follows the Solveeczema guidelines quite effectively to keep his skin clear, uses the California Baby stick sunscreens without problems.

Per Solveeczema.org, barrier-type sunscreens (such as with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide) are  a better bet than those that absorb.

Luckily, per the EWG’s evaluations, the majority of sunscreens on their safest ingredients list also seem to be zinc oxide and/or titanium dioxide based.  As with other products, it’s always good to try a small patch for sensitivity first.  (All sunscreens contain other ingredients; always be aware of the potential for allergy to other ingredients, especially in the sun and water.)

Have a safe and fun summer!

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